Brenda Briggs, a native of Flint, Mich., pushes a grocery cart full of bottled water to her home, which was several blocks away from a water drive put on by volunteers from Syracuse and Buffalo, New York, in the North side of Flint on Saturday, February 6, 2016. Briggs, a mother of three and grandmother to four, made the journey to nearby water resource centers every week despite arthritis pains and maintaining her diabetes.

Brenda Briggs, a native of Flint, Mich., pushes a grocery cart full of bottled water to her home, which was several blocks away from a water drive put on by volunteers from Syracuse and Buffalo, New York, in the North side of Flint on Saturday, February 6, 2016. Briggs, a mother of three and grandmother to four, made the journey to nearby water resource centers every week despite arthritis pains and maintaining her diabetes.

 Bertha White, 64, of Flint, Mich., opens her front door to local police officers to accept a new filter and gallon jugs of water during a distribution to residents by the Genesee County sheriff's office on January 7, 2016. Distributions continued through the day on the city's north side, which is lower income, with 1,000 water filters on the service truck. A primary worry for local officials had been that the limited mobility for the elderly forced them to drink the lead tainted tap water for longer than the rest of the population. The door to door program was eventually replaced by a hotline that elderly citizens could call for water deliveries.

Bertha White, 64, of Flint, Mich., opens her front door to local police officers to accept a new filter and gallon jugs of water during a distribution to residents by the Genesee County sheriff's office on January 7, 2016. Distributions continued through the day on the city's north side, which is lower income, with 1,000 water filters on the service truck. A primary worry for local officials had been that the limited mobility for the elderly forced them to drink the lead tainted tap water for longer than the rest of the population. The door to door program was eventually replaced by a hotline that elderly citizens could call for water deliveries.

 Keri Webber, of Flint, Mich., washes dishes using surgical gloves for protection on January 7, 2016. Although city officials had declared the water safe to bathe in and wash with, Webber felt she should limit her exposure as much as possible and is still distrustful of remarks made by the city.

Keri Webber, of Flint, Mich., washes dishes using surgical gloves for protection on January 7, 2016. Although city officials had declared the water safe to bathe in and wash with, Webber felt she should limit her exposure as much as possible and is still distrustful of remarks made by the city.

 Adam Murphy, 36, gives his newborn son, Declan Murphy, his second bath since birth with bottled water at his family's home in Flint, Mich., on April 9, 2016. Declan, now two has never had a drink of the city’s tap water.

Adam Murphy, 36, gives his newborn son, Declan Murphy, his second bath since birth with bottled water at his family's home in Flint, Mich., on April 9, 2016. Declan, now two has never had a drink of the city’s tap water.

 Journey Jones, 3, sits on the kitchen floor in her family's home as her brother Iveon Jones, 2, reaches for a bottled water. The pair are two of six children living in the home, all of whom have had elevated levels of lead in their blood. Their mother says she is at a loss as to what their futures hold. Iveon, she said, has already been displaying behavior issues, a common symptom of lead poisoning in children.

Journey Jones, 3, sits on the kitchen floor in her family's home as her brother Iveon Jones, 2, reaches for a bottled water. The pair are two of six children living in the home, all of whom have had elevated levels of lead in their blood. Their mother says she is at a loss as to what their futures hold. Iveon, she said, has already been displaying behavior issues, a common symptom of lead poisoning in children.

 A member of the Michigan National Guard gazes over his shoulder at a long line of residents form to pick up bottled water at Fire Station #3 on March 5, 2016. To the complaints of many, residents were only allotted two cases per a family at a time.

A member of the Michigan National Guard gazes over his shoulder at a long line of residents form to pick up bottled water at Fire Station #3 on March 5, 2016. To the complaints of many, residents were only allotted two cases per a family at a time.

 Earlene Love, 64, prays alongside her peers as protestors gather outside the Romney building, which houses the office of Governor Rick Snyder, in Lansing, Mich., on January 14, 2016. Earlier protestors had filled the front entrance of the building, conflicting with officers who said they would not be permitted inside. Throughout the city's water crisis, many residents have viewed Snyder as a distant leader whose priorities were never on Flint's well being.

Earlene Love, 64, prays alongside her peers as protestors gather outside the Romney building, which houses the office of Governor Rick Snyder, in Lansing, Mich., on January 14, 2016. Earlier protestors had filled the front entrance of the building, conflicting with officers who said they would not be permitted inside. Throughout the city's water crisis, many residents have viewed Snyder as a distant leader whose priorities were never on Flint's well being.

 Protestors bear signs likening Michigan Governor Rick Snyder to the devil as they wait for a scheduled march to begin in front of the Metropolitan Baptist Tabernacle Church in Flint, Mich., on Friday, February 19, 2016.

Protestors bear signs likening Michigan Governor Rick Snyder to the devil as they wait for a scheduled march to begin in front of the Metropolitan Baptist Tabernacle Church in Flint, Mich., on Friday, February 19, 2016.

 Keeghan Nelson, 4, of Flint, Mich., gets his blood lead levels tested at Carriage Town Ministries in Flint, Mich., on Thursday, February 4, 2016. Several blood lead level testing events have been put on in partnership with the Michigan State Health Department following the declaration for a state of emergency in the city.

Keeghan Nelson, 4, of Flint, Mich., gets his blood lead levels tested at Carriage Town Ministries in Flint, Mich., on Thursday, February 4, 2016. Several blood lead level testing events have been put on in partnership with the Michigan State Health Department following the declaration for a state of emergency in the city.

 City Council President Kerry Nelson listens to the concerns of a resident as she voices her concerns for local water rates and the lack of current aid as the Flint City Council holds a meeting to discuss whether residents should have to pay their water bills in full at Flint City Hall on February 8, 2016. Despite the ongoing water crisis, Flint water rates remain among the highest in the nation. The meeting lasted four hours as tensions escalated.

City Council President Kerry Nelson listens to the concerns of a resident as she voices her concerns for local water rates and the lack of current aid as the Flint City Council holds a meeting to discuss whether residents should have to pay their water bills in full at Flint City Hall on February 8, 2016. Despite the ongoing water crisis, Flint water rates remain among the highest in the nation. The meeting lasted four hours as tensions escalated.

 Hundreds of index cards, possessing the addresses of local water lines and whether or not they are made of lead, are stacked in one of the filing cabinets at the City of Flint Division of Water Service Center on February 11, 2016. There were roughly 50,000 cards in total, organized by street name, however, not all had complete information regarding the lead lines as they date back to the 1920's. In the Fall of 2015, when the presence of lead was first publicly announced to be in the tap water of residents, only a fourth of the cards were computerized leaving many community members in the dark about their own plumbing system.

Hundreds of index cards, possessing the addresses of local water lines and whether or not they are made of lead, are stacked in one of the filing cabinets at the City of Flint Division of Water Service Center on February 11, 2016. There were roughly 50,000 cards in total, organized by street name, however, not all had complete information regarding the lead lines as they date back to the 1920's. In the Fall of 2015, when the presence of lead was first publicly announced to be in the tap water of residents, only a fourth of the cards were computerized leaving many community members in the dark about their own plumbing system.

 Sincere Smith, 5, gazes out of the window of his mother's car at the Flint river after noticing the water level had risen significantly following heavy rains on April 18, 2018. His mother, Ariana Hawk, previously remarked that the Flint river water, which was the city's water source at the start of the water crisis, still makes him nervous and he knows it as the water that gave him rashes.

Sincere Smith, 5, gazes out of the window of his mother's car at the Flint river after noticing the water level had risen significantly following heavy rains on April 18, 2018. His mother, Ariana Hawk, previously remarked that the Flint river water, which was the city's water source at the start of the water crisis, still makes him nervous and he knows it as the water that gave him rashes.

 Mae Lores, 48, of Flint, Mich., shows her hair loss after removing her wig at her home in Flint, Mich., on April 19, 2016. Following the city's switch to the Flint River, Lores suffered rapid hair loss which she now notes as a source of stress and anxiety. "Your hair is a woman's charm," Lores said. Many women, especially those within the African-American community, shared stories of hair loss and skin rashes.

Mae Lores, 48, of Flint, Mich., shows her hair loss after removing her wig at her home in Flint, Mich., on April 19, 2016. Following the city's switch to the Flint River, Lores suffered rapid hair loss which she now notes as a source of stress and anxiety. "Your hair is a woman's charm," Lores said. Many women, especially those within the African-American community, shared stories of hair loss and skin rashes.

 A pit bull is held by multiple veterinary students from Michigan State University during a free lead testing event for animals at the parish hall of St. Paul's Episcopal Church in Flint on Saturday, March 19, 2016.

A pit bull is held by multiple veterinary students from Michigan State University during a free lead testing event for animals at the parish hall of St. Paul's Episcopal Church in Flint on Saturday, March 19, 2016.

 Tim Monahan, 58, sits in his bedroom at his home in Flint, Mich., where he lives with his partner, on Saturday, February 13, 2016. Monahan was diagnosed with Legionnaires, a bacterial pneumonia, in July of 2014 and was one of the first cases amidst a Legionnaires spike in Genesee County following the switch to the Flint river as a water source months prior. "They (city officials) knew what was going on and they didn't tell anyone," Monahan said. "If the public had been told that here was a bacterial outbreak I don't know if you would have had eight or nine people die."

Tim Monahan, 58, sits in his bedroom at his home in Flint, Mich., where he lives with his partner, on Saturday, February 13, 2016. Monahan was diagnosed with Legionnaires, a bacterial pneumonia, in July of 2014 and was one of the first cases amidst a Legionnaires spike in Genesee County following the switch to the Flint river as a water source months prior. "They (city officials) knew what was going on and they didn't tell anyone," Monahan said. "If the public had been told that here was a bacterial outbreak I don't know if you would have had eight or nine people die."

 Shirley Williams, 55, of Flint, Mich., peers from a window as she and other residents are held in a nearby hallway during an informational meeting regarding personal injury lawsuits held at the Northbank Center in downtown Flint. The room, which fit nearly 400 people was over capacity within minutes.

Shirley Williams, 55, of Flint, Mich., peers from a window as she and other residents are held in a nearby hallway during an informational meeting regarding personal injury lawsuits held at the Northbank Center in downtown Flint. The room, which fit nearly 400 people was over capacity within minutes.

 Keri Webber tests the blood pressure of her husband, Michael Webber, at their home in Flint on May 22, 2017. Just days before the reports of lead in the water went public, Keri's husband Michael suffered an eye stroke leaving him nearly blind in one eye. He said he now understands it to be a direct result of his skyrocketing blood pressure, a common symptom of lead poisoning in adults. All members of the Webber family have been diagnosed with lead poisoning.

Keri Webber tests the blood pressure of her husband, Michael Webber, at their home in Flint on May 22, 2017. Just days before the reports of lead in the water went public, Keri's husband Michael suffered an eye stroke leaving him nearly blind in one eye. He said he now understands it to be a direct result of his skyrocketing blood pressure, a common symptom of lead poisoning in adults. All members of the Webber family have been diagnosed with lead poisoning.

  Christian and Adam Murphy, become angered with their son, Cillian's, pediatrician, after discussing testing alternatives to see how much lead he may have been exposed to at the time the city was using the Flint River as a water source during an appointment at Hurley Children's Hospital in Flint, Mich., on May 7, 2016. According to the pediatrician, Hurley has planned to treat all children as though they had been lead poisoned as a wholistic approach to benefit the community at large. The Murphy's, however, were disappointed at the lack of direct answers from those in the medical field and felt they were not doing enough for their son and the likelihood he could develop a learning disorder.

Christian and Adam Murphy, become angered with their son, Cillian's, pediatrician, after discussing testing alternatives to see how much lead he may have been exposed to at the time the city was using the Flint River as a water source during an appointment at Hurley Children's Hospital in Flint, Mich., on May 7, 2016. According to the pediatrician, Hurley has planned to treat all children as though they had been lead poisoned as a wholistic approach to benefit the community at large. The Murphy's, however, were disappointed at the lack of direct answers from those in the medical field and felt they were not doing enough for their son and the likelihood he could develop a learning disorder.

 A water donation sign sits in the snow in front of the Jackson Memorial Temple Church in Flint, Mich., on February 18, 2016. Since the declaration for a state of emergency in the city in early January, many local churches took on the responsibility of distributing water to Flint residents.

A water donation sign sits in the snow in front of the Jackson Memorial Temple Church in Flint, Mich., on February 18, 2016. Since the declaration for a state of emergency in the city in early January, many local churches took on the responsibility of distributing water to Flint residents.

 Gail Morton, 64, of Flint, Mich., sobs as she watches protestors gather following a scheduled march with the Rev. Jesse Jackson that made it's way from the Metropolitan Baptist Tabernacle Church over a mile to the front of the the City of Flint Water Plant, on Friday, February 19, 2016. "As a small child growing up you could almost see what our parents went through. We didn't have the rights. We didn't even have the rights to live in certain neighborhoods," Morton said. "I am so proud today, I mean, I am really proud."

Gail Morton, 64, of Flint, Mich., sobs as she watches protestors gather following a scheduled march with the Rev. Jesse Jackson that made it's way from the Metropolitan Baptist Tabernacle Church over a mile to the front of the the City of Flint Water Plant, on Friday, February 19, 2016. "As a small child growing up you could almost see what our parents went through. We didn't have the rights. We didn't even have the rights to live in certain neighborhoods," Morton said. "I am so proud today, I mean, I am really proud."

 Members of New Era Detroit and friends gather and lead a chant outside of a convenient store to hand out water to Flint residents, as well as spread a message of racial equality, in Flint, Mich., on Saturday, February 20, 2016. Tensions mounted earlier when the owner of another convenient store wouldn't give business to a few members of the group, members said. Throughout Flint's water crisis, many residents begged the question whether or not it would have happened to a city that was predominately white.

Members of New Era Detroit and friends gather and lead a chant outside of a convenient store to hand out water to Flint residents, as well as spread a message of racial equality, in Flint, Mich., on Saturday, February 20, 2016. Tensions mounted earlier when the owner of another convenient store wouldn't give business to a few members of the group, members said. Throughout Flint's water crisis, many residents begged the question whether or not it would have happened to a city that was predominately white.

 Taywana James, 45, of Syracuse, New York, breaks down in tears following a comment from a state lawmaker during a protest at the Michigan State Capitol on April 11, 2018 in Lansing, Michigan. According to James and several protestors, the lawmaker allegedly said "You see what they going to do to you," in regards to protestors being escorted out of the state legislature after they broke out into a chant. The state run water distribution sites closed in early April of 2018 after officials said the water quality is meeting federal standards.

Taywana James, 45, of Syracuse, New York, breaks down in tears following a comment from a state lawmaker during a protest at the Michigan State Capitol on April 11, 2018 in Lansing, Michigan. According to James and several protestors, the lawmaker allegedly said "You see what they going to do to you," in regards to protestors being escorted out of the state legislature after they broke out into a chant. The state run water distribution sites closed in early April of 2018 after officials said the water quality is meeting federal standards.

 Julius Austin, 28, of Detroit, Mich., answers a call while working at the Due Season Family Life Center as part of efforts for Stop Snyder, a recent political startup calling for Governor Rick Snyder's resignation, in Flint, Mich., on April 20, 2016.

Julius Austin, 28, of Detroit, Mich., answers a call while working at the Due Season Family Life Center as part of efforts for Stop Snyder, a recent political startup calling for Governor Rick Snyder's resignation, in Flint, Mich., on April 20, 2016.

 Darline Long, 58, of Flint, Mich., embraces her daughter, Wendy Long, 36, as she and her family spend the evening at a Super 8 Motel in Burton, Mich., on April 9, 2016. Long and her family stayed at the motel specifically to bathe outside of the city of Flint. The family makes the trip only when they have the funds available and see it as an opportunity to bond over the trauma they've faced.

Darline Long, 58, of Flint, Mich., embraces her daughter, Wendy Long, 36, as she and her family spend the evening at a Super 8 Motel in Burton, Mich., on April 9, 2016. Long and her family stayed at the motel specifically to bathe outside of the city of Flint. The family makes the trip only when they have the funds available and see it as an opportunity to bond over the trauma they've faced.

 A full cast of dancers line the stage for curtain call following their performance in the University of Michigan-Flint's Spring Dance Concert in downtown Flint, on Sunday April 17, 2016. In the final dance, thousands of empty water bottles were dropped from the catwalk onto the stage to pay homage to the city's dependence on bottled water.

A full cast of dancers line the stage for curtain call following their performance in the University of Michigan-Flint's Spring Dance Concert in downtown Flint, on Sunday April 17, 2016. In the final dance, thousands of empty water bottles were dropped from the catwalk onto the stage to pay homage to the city's dependence on bottled water.

 Josette Malone, 41, and Derrick Webster, 44, stand outside waiting for a ride from a friend after picking up cases of water from the Berston Field-House in Flint, on April 22, 2018. Following the closure of the state run free water distribution sites, community centers and churches stepped in to help the few residents that were able to find transit to a a very limited amount of water donations. At some sites, residents waited for over two hours to pick up cases of bottled water.

Josette Malone, 41, and Derrick Webster, 44, stand outside waiting for a ride from a friend after picking up cases of water from the Berston Field-House in Flint, on April 22, 2018. Following the closure of the state run free water distribution sites, community centers and churches stepped in to help the few residents that were able to find transit to a a very limited amount of water donations. At some sites, residents waited for over two hours to pick up cases of bottled water.

 Jeff Sorensen, 33, clings on to a teddy bear while packing his studio apartment with his wife, Jess, as they prepare to move to Utah on February 26, 2016. The couple relocated due to the water crisis and lack of employment options in the city of Flint.

Jeff Sorensen, 33, clings on to a teddy bear while packing his studio apartment with his wife, Jess, as they prepare to move to Utah on February 26, 2016. The couple relocated due to the water crisis and lack of employment options in the city of Flint.

 Christina Murphy, 35, of Flint, Mich., holds her newborn son, Declan Murphy, during a removal and replacement of a lead pipeline outside of their home on May, 7, 2016. Due to a disorganized construction grant that replaced the eroded pipes in the interior home, Christina and her family of five were displaced in hotel rooms for over three weeks. This was one of the few visits they were able to make to the home to oversee construction. According to mapping by the University of Michigan-Flint, there are over 4,000 known lead lines. Four years into the crisis, replacement efforts continue.

Christina Murphy, 35, of Flint, Mich., holds her newborn son, Declan Murphy, during a removal and replacement of a lead pipeline outside of their home on May, 7, 2016. Due to a disorganized construction grant that replaced the eroded pipes in the interior home, Christina and her family of five were displaced in hotel rooms for over three weeks. This was one of the few visits they were able to make to the home to oversee construction. According to mapping by the University of Michigan-Flint, there are over 4,000 known lead lines. Four years into the crisis, replacement efforts continue.

 Brenda Briggs, a native of Flint, Mich., pushes a grocery cart full of bottled water to her home, which was several blocks away from a water drive put on by volunteers from Syracuse and Buffalo, New York, in the North side of Flint on Saturday, February 6, 2016. Briggs, a mother of three and grandmother to four, made the journey to nearby water resource centers every week despite arthritis pains and maintaining her diabetes.
 Bertha White, 64, of Flint, Mich., opens her front door to local police officers to accept a new filter and gallon jugs of water during a distribution to residents by the Genesee County sheriff's office on January 7, 2016. Distributions continued through the day on the city's north side, which is lower income, with 1,000 water filters on the service truck. A primary worry for local officials had been that the limited mobility for the elderly forced them to drink the lead tainted tap water for longer than the rest of the population. The door to door program was eventually replaced by a hotline that elderly citizens could call for water deliveries.
 Keri Webber, of Flint, Mich., washes dishes using surgical gloves for protection on January 7, 2016. Although city officials had declared the water safe to bathe in and wash with, Webber felt she should limit her exposure as much as possible and is still distrustful of remarks made by the city.
 Adam Murphy, 36, gives his newborn son, Declan Murphy, his second bath since birth with bottled water at his family's home in Flint, Mich., on April 9, 2016. Declan, now two has never had a drink of the city’s tap water.
 Journey Jones, 3, sits on the kitchen floor in her family's home as her brother Iveon Jones, 2, reaches for a bottled water. The pair are two of six children living in the home, all of whom have had elevated levels of lead in their blood. Their mother says she is at a loss as to what their futures hold. Iveon, she said, has already been displaying behavior issues, a common symptom of lead poisoning in children.
 A member of the Michigan National Guard gazes over his shoulder at a long line of residents form to pick up bottled water at Fire Station #3 on March 5, 2016. To the complaints of many, residents were only allotted two cases per a family at a time.
 Earlene Love, 64, prays alongside her peers as protestors gather outside the Romney building, which houses the office of Governor Rick Snyder, in Lansing, Mich., on January 14, 2016. Earlier protestors had filled the front entrance of the building, conflicting with officers who said they would not be permitted inside. Throughout the city's water crisis, many residents have viewed Snyder as a distant leader whose priorities were never on Flint's well being.
 Protestors bear signs likening Michigan Governor Rick Snyder to the devil as they wait for a scheduled march to begin in front of the Metropolitan Baptist Tabernacle Church in Flint, Mich., on Friday, February 19, 2016.
 Keeghan Nelson, 4, of Flint, Mich., gets his blood lead levels tested at Carriage Town Ministries in Flint, Mich., on Thursday, February 4, 2016. Several blood lead level testing events have been put on in partnership with the Michigan State Health Department following the declaration for a state of emergency in the city.
 City Council President Kerry Nelson listens to the concerns of a resident as she voices her concerns for local water rates and the lack of current aid as the Flint City Council holds a meeting to discuss whether residents should have to pay their water bills in full at Flint City Hall on February 8, 2016. Despite the ongoing water crisis, Flint water rates remain among the highest in the nation. The meeting lasted four hours as tensions escalated.
 Hundreds of index cards, possessing the addresses of local water lines and whether or not they are made of lead, are stacked in one of the filing cabinets at the City of Flint Division of Water Service Center on February 11, 2016. There were roughly 50,000 cards in total, organized by street name, however, not all had complete information regarding the lead lines as they date back to the 1920's. In the Fall of 2015, when the presence of lead was first publicly announced to be in the tap water of residents, only a fourth of the cards were computerized leaving many community members in the dark about their own plumbing system.
 Sincere Smith, 5, gazes out of the window of his mother's car at the Flint river after noticing the water level had risen significantly following heavy rains on April 18, 2018. His mother, Ariana Hawk, previously remarked that the Flint river water, which was the city's water source at the start of the water crisis, still makes him nervous and he knows it as the water that gave him rashes.
 Mae Lores, 48, of Flint, Mich., shows her hair loss after removing her wig at her home in Flint, Mich., on April 19, 2016. Following the city's switch to the Flint River, Lores suffered rapid hair loss which she now notes as a source of stress and anxiety. "Your hair is a woman's charm," Lores said. Many women, especially those within the African-American community, shared stories of hair loss and skin rashes.
 A pit bull is held by multiple veterinary students from Michigan State University during a free lead testing event for animals at the parish hall of St. Paul's Episcopal Church in Flint on Saturday, March 19, 2016.
 Tim Monahan, 58, sits in his bedroom at his home in Flint, Mich., where he lives with his partner, on Saturday, February 13, 2016. Monahan was diagnosed with Legionnaires, a bacterial pneumonia, in July of 2014 and was one of the first cases amidst a Legionnaires spike in Genesee County following the switch to the Flint river as a water source months prior. "They (city officials) knew what was going on and they didn't tell anyone," Monahan said. "If the public had been told that here was a bacterial outbreak I don't know if you would have had eight or nine people die."
 Shirley Williams, 55, of Flint, Mich., peers from a window as she and other residents are held in a nearby hallway during an informational meeting regarding personal injury lawsuits held at the Northbank Center in downtown Flint. The room, which fit nearly 400 people was over capacity within minutes.
 Keri Webber tests the blood pressure of her husband, Michael Webber, at their home in Flint on May 22, 2017. Just days before the reports of lead in the water went public, Keri's husband Michael suffered an eye stroke leaving him nearly blind in one eye. He said he now understands it to be a direct result of his skyrocketing blood pressure, a common symptom of lead poisoning in adults. All members of the Webber family have been diagnosed with lead poisoning.
  Christian and Adam Murphy, become angered with their son, Cillian's, pediatrician, after discussing testing alternatives to see how much lead he may have been exposed to at the time the city was using the Flint River as a water source during an appointment at Hurley Children's Hospital in Flint, Mich., on May 7, 2016. According to the pediatrician, Hurley has planned to treat all children as though they had been lead poisoned as a wholistic approach to benefit the community at large. The Murphy's, however, were disappointed at the lack of direct answers from those in the medical field and felt they were not doing enough for their son and the likelihood he could develop a learning disorder.
 A water donation sign sits in the snow in front of the Jackson Memorial Temple Church in Flint, Mich., on February 18, 2016. Since the declaration for a state of emergency in the city in early January, many local churches took on the responsibility of distributing water to Flint residents.
 Gail Morton, 64, of Flint, Mich., sobs as she watches protestors gather following a scheduled march with the Rev. Jesse Jackson that made it's way from the Metropolitan Baptist Tabernacle Church over a mile to the front of the the City of Flint Water Plant, on Friday, February 19, 2016. "As a small child growing up you could almost see what our parents went through. We didn't have the rights. We didn't even have the rights to live in certain neighborhoods," Morton said. "I am so proud today, I mean, I am really proud."
 Members of New Era Detroit and friends gather and lead a chant outside of a convenient store to hand out water to Flint residents, as well as spread a message of racial equality, in Flint, Mich., on Saturday, February 20, 2016. Tensions mounted earlier when the owner of another convenient store wouldn't give business to a few members of the group, members said. Throughout Flint's water crisis, many residents begged the question whether or not it would have happened to a city that was predominately white.
 Taywana James, 45, of Syracuse, New York, breaks down in tears following a comment from a state lawmaker during a protest at the Michigan State Capitol on April 11, 2018 in Lansing, Michigan. According to James and several protestors, the lawmaker allegedly said "You see what they going to do to you," in regards to protestors being escorted out of the state legislature after they broke out into a chant. The state run water distribution sites closed in early April of 2018 after officials said the water quality is meeting federal standards.
 Julius Austin, 28, of Detroit, Mich., answers a call while working at the Due Season Family Life Center as part of efforts for Stop Snyder, a recent political startup calling for Governor Rick Snyder's resignation, in Flint, Mich., on April 20, 2016.
 Darline Long, 58, of Flint, Mich., embraces her daughter, Wendy Long, 36, as she and her family spend the evening at a Super 8 Motel in Burton, Mich., on April 9, 2016. Long and her family stayed at the motel specifically to bathe outside of the city of Flint. The family makes the trip only when they have the funds available and see it as an opportunity to bond over the trauma they've faced.
 A full cast of dancers line the stage for curtain call following their performance in the University of Michigan-Flint's Spring Dance Concert in downtown Flint, on Sunday April 17, 2016. In the final dance, thousands of empty water bottles were dropped from the catwalk onto the stage to pay homage to the city's dependence on bottled water.
 Josette Malone, 41, and Derrick Webster, 44, stand outside waiting for a ride from a friend after picking up cases of water from the Berston Field-House in Flint, on April 22, 2018. Following the closure of the state run free water distribution sites, community centers and churches stepped in to help the few residents that were able to find transit to a a very limited amount of water donations. At some sites, residents waited for over two hours to pick up cases of bottled water.
 Jeff Sorensen, 33, clings on to a teddy bear while packing his studio apartment with his wife, Jess, as they prepare to move to Utah on February 26, 2016. The couple relocated due to the water crisis and lack of employment options in the city of Flint.
 Christina Murphy, 35, of Flint, Mich., holds her newborn son, Declan Murphy, during a removal and replacement of a lead pipeline outside of their home on May, 7, 2016. Due to a disorganized construction grant that replaced the eroded pipes in the interior home, Christina and her family of five were displaced in hotel rooms for over three weeks. This was one of the few visits they were able to make to the home to oversee construction. According to mapping by the University of Michigan-Flint, there are over 4,000 known lead lines. Four years into the crisis, replacement efforts continue.

Brenda Briggs, a native of Flint, Mich., pushes a grocery cart full of bottled water to her home, which was several blocks away from a water drive put on by volunteers from Syracuse and Buffalo, New York, in the North side of Flint on Saturday, February 6, 2016. Briggs, a mother of three and grandmother to four, made the journey to nearby water resource centers every week despite arthritis pains and maintaining her diabetes.

Bertha White, 64, of Flint, Mich., opens her front door to local police officers to accept a new filter and gallon jugs of water during a distribution to residents by the Genesee County sheriff's office on January 7, 2016. Distributions continued through the day on the city's north side, which is lower income, with 1,000 water filters on the service truck. A primary worry for local officials had been that the limited mobility for the elderly forced them to drink the lead tainted tap water for longer than the rest of the population. The door to door program was eventually replaced by a hotline that elderly citizens could call for water deliveries.

Keri Webber, of Flint, Mich., washes dishes using surgical gloves for protection on January 7, 2016. Although city officials had declared the water safe to bathe in and wash with, Webber felt she should limit her exposure as much as possible and is still distrustful of remarks made by the city.

Adam Murphy, 36, gives his newborn son, Declan Murphy, his second bath since birth with bottled water at his family's home in Flint, Mich., on April 9, 2016. Declan, now two has never had a drink of the city’s tap water.

Journey Jones, 3, sits on the kitchen floor in her family's home as her brother Iveon Jones, 2, reaches for a bottled water. The pair are two of six children living in the home, all of whom have had elevated levels of lead in their blood. Their mother says she is at a loss as to what their futures hold. Iveon, she said, has already been displaying behavior issues, a common symptom of lead poisoning in children.

A member of the Michigan National Guard gazes over his shoulder at a long line of residents form to pick up bottled water at Fire Station #3 on March 5, 2016. To the complaints of many, residents were only allotted two cases per a family at a time.

Earlene Love, 64, prays alongside her peers as protestors gather outside the Romney building, which houses the office of Governor Rick Snyder, in Lansing, Mich., on January 14, 2016. Earlier protestors had filled the front entrance of the building, conflicting with officers who said they would not be permitted inside. Throughout the city's water crisis, many residents have viewed Snyder as a distant leader whose priorities were never on Flint's well being.

Protestors bear signs likening Michigan Governor Rick Snyder to the devil as they wait for a scheduled march to begin in front of the Metropolitan Baptist Tabernacle Church in Flint, Mich., on Friday, February 19, 2016.

Keeghan Nelson, 4, of Flint, Mich., gets his blood lead levels tested at Carriage Town Ministries in Flint, Mich., on Thursday, February 4, 2016. Several blood lead level testing events have been put on in partnership with the Michigan State Health Department following the declaration for a state of emergency in the city.

City Council President Kerry Nelson listens to the concerns of a resident as she voices her concerns for local water rates and the lack of current aid as the Flint City Council holds a meeting to discuss whether residents should have to pay their water bills in full at Flint City Hall on February 8, 2016. Despite the ongoing water crisis, Flint water rates remain among the highest in the nation. The meeting lasted four hours as tensions escalated.

Hundreds of index cards, possessing the addresses of local water lines and whether or not they are made of lead, are stacked in one of the filing cabinets at the City of Flint Division of Water Service Center on February 11, 2016. There were roughly 50,000 cards in total, organized by street name, however, not all had complete information regarding the lead lines as they date back to the 1920's. In the Fall of 2015, when the presence of lead was first publicly announced to be in the tap water of residents, only a fourth of the cards were computerized leaving many community members in the dark about their own plumbing system.

Sincere Smith, 5, gazes out of the window of his mother's car at the Flint river after noticing the water level had risen significantly following heavy rains on April 18, 2018. His mother, Ariana Hawk, previously remarked that the Flint river water, which was the city's water source at the start of the water crisis, still makes him nervous and he knows it as the water that gave him rashes.

Mae Lores, 48, of Flint, Mich., shows her hair loss after removing her wig at her home in Flint, Mich., on April 19, 2016. Following the city's switch to the Flint River, Lores suffered rapid hair loss which she now notes as a source of stress and anxiety. "Your hair is a woman's charm," Lores said. Many women, especially those within the African-American community, shared stories of hair loss and skin rashes.

A pit bull is held by multiple veterinary students from Michigan State University during a free lead testing event for animals at the parish hall of St. Paul's Episcopal Church in Flint on Saturday, March 19, 2016.

Tim Monahan, 58, sits in his bedroom at his home in Flint, Mich., where he lives with his partner, on Saturday, February 13, 2016. Monahan was diagnosed with Legionnaires, a bacterial pneumonia, in July of 2014 and was one of the first cases amidst a Legionnaires spike in Genesee County following the switch to the Flint river as a water source months prior. "They (city officials) knew what was going on and they didn't tell anyone," Monahan said. "If the public had been told that here was a bacterial outbreak I don't know if you would have had eight or nine people die."

Shirley Williams, 55, of Flint, Mich., peers from a window as she and other residents are held in a nearby hallway during an informational meeting regarding personal injury lawsuits held at the Northbank Center in downtown Flint. The room, which fit nearly 400 people was over capacity within minutes.

Keri Webber tests the blood pressure of her husband, Michael Webber, at their home in Flint on May 22, 2017. Just days before the reports of lead in the water went public, Keri's husband Michael suffered an eye stroke leaving him nearly blind in one eye. He said he now understands it to be a direct result of his skyrocketing blood pressure, a common symptom of lead poisoning in adults. All members of the Webber family have been diagnosed with lead poisoning.

Christian and Adam Murphy, become angered with their son, Cillian's, pediatrician, after discussing testing alternatives to see how much lead he may have been exposed to at the time the city was using the Flint River as a water source during an appointment at Hurley Children's Hospital in Flint, Mich., on May 7, 2016. According to the pediatrician, Hurley has planned to treat all children as though they had been lead poisoned as a wholistic approach to benefit the community at large. The Murphy's, however, were disappointed at the lack of direct answers from those in the medical field and felt they were not doing enough for their son and the likelihood he could develop a learning disorder.

A water donation sign sits in the snow in front of the Jackson Memorial Temple Church in Flint, Mich., on February 18, 2016. Since the declaration for a state of emergency in the city in early January, many local churches took on the responsibility of distributing water to Flint residents.

Gail Morton, 64, of Flint, Mich., sobs as she watches protestors gather following a scheduled march with the Rev. Jesse Jackson that made it's way from the Metropolitan Baptist Tabernacle Church over a mile to the front of the the City of Flint Water Plant, on Friday, February 19, 2016. "As a small child growing up you could almost see what our parents went through. We didn't have the rights. We didn't even have the rights to live in certain neighborhoods," Morton said. "I am so proud today, I mean, I am really proud."

Members of New Era Detroit and friends gather and lead a chant outside of a convenient store to hand out water to Flint residents, as well as spread a message of racial equality, in Flint, Mich., on Saturday, February 20, 2016. Tensions mounted earlier when the owner of another convenient store wouldn't give business to a few members of the group, members said. Throughout Flint's water crisis, many residents begged the question whether or not it would have happened to a city that was predominately white.

Taywana James, 45, of Syracuse, New York, breaks down in tears following a comment from a state lawmaker during a protest at the Michigan State Capitol on April 11, 2018 in Lansing, Michigan. According to James and several protestors, the lawmaker allegedly said "You see what they going to do to you," in regards to protestors being escorted out of the state legislature after they broke out into a chant. The state run water distribution sites closed in early April of 2018 after officials said the water quality is meeting federal standards.

Julius Austin, 28, of Detroit, Mich., answers a call while working at the Due Season Family Life Center as part of efforts for Stop Snyder, a recent political startup calling for Governor Rick Snyder's resignation, in Flint, Mich., on April 20, 2016.

Darline Long, 58, of Flint, Mich., embraces her daughter, Wendy Long, 36, as she and her family spend the evening at a Super 8 Motel in Burton, Mich., on April 9, 2016. Long and her family stayed at the motel specifically to bathe outside of the city of Flint. The family makes the trip only when they have the funds available and see it as an opportunity to bond over the trauma they've faced.

A full cast of dancers line the stage for curtain call following their performance in the University of Michigan-Flint's Spring Dance Concert in downtown Flint, on Sunday April 17, 2016. In the final dance, thousands of empty water bottles were dropped from the catwalk onto the stage to pay homage to the city's dependence on bottled water.

Josette Malone, 41, and Derrick Webster, 44, stand outside waiting for a ride from a friend after picking up cases of water from the Berston Field-House in Flint, on April 22, 2018. Following the closure of the state run free water distribution sites, community centers and churches stepped in to help the few residents that were able to find transit to a a very limited amount of water donations. At some sites, residents waited for over two hours to pick up cases of bottled water.

Jeff Sorensen, 33, clings on to a teddy bear while packing his studio apartment with his wife, Jess, as they prepare to move to Utah on February 26, 2016. The couple relocated due to the water crisis and lack of employment options in the city of Flint.

Christina Murphy, 35, of Flint, Mich., holds her newborn son, Declan Murphy, during a removal and replacement of a lead pipeline outside of their home on May, 7, 2016. Due to a disorganized construction grant that replaced the eroded pipes in the interior home, Christina and her family of five were displaced in hotel rooms for over three weeks. This was one of the few visits they were able to make to the home to oversee construction. According to mapping by the University of Michigan-Flint, there are over 4,000 known lead lines. Four years into the crisis, replacement efforts continue.

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